Discipline is not a four-letter word

Somewhere along the way the word discipline has, for some, become a four-letter word.  Isn’t discipline a good thing?  Don’t I need discipline to sustain a habit, change my lifestyle, or excel at anything I do.  Isn’t it important that I learn self-discipline so I can monitor my own progress toward any goal.  If I don’t have it or know what it looks like, isn’t it important that I have someone to help guide me there? Now, I know that’s probably not what is often meant when people use the term discipline, but therein lies the problem.  If by discipline you mean punishment then say punishment.  Living in the world of connotation opens the door to misunderstandings even when we actually agree.

I don’t want to move “beyond discipline”; I want discipline, self-regulation and self-control…and I want it for my students.  I certainly want to move “beyond punishment” to engage in more meaningful dialogue to assist students in understanding where things went wrong, how they can restore their relationships, and how to avoid making the same mistake again.

For schools, discipline plans or systems should be designed as instruments of support & inclusion, NOT removal and isolation. The focus should be on teaching what is socially acceptable within the given context and helping students learn what is and is not appropriate. Students are greatly influenced by the parameters outlined by the adults they interact with and are taught, both directly and indirectly, what is socially acceptable. Do we not celebrate coaches who can instill a disciplined atmosphere within their team? Do students not need discipline to prevent themselves from reacting inappropriately while emotionally charged?

Discipline is a good thing; the misuse of discipline – or mistaking punishment for discipline –  doesn’t render the idea of discipline inappropriate or ineffective. Effective school discipline brings a sense of belonging, an atmosphere of inclusion, a feeling of predictability, and a climate of respect.

3 thoughts on “Discipline is not a four-letter word

  1. And let’s not forget…
    disciple, discipline – Disciple comes from a Latin word meaning “learner” and discipline comes from one meaning “instruction, knowledge.”

    • Thanks Tami. The word discipline can take on (or be given) many meanings. True discipline is about learning and growing from every situation. Thanks for commenting!

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