I Trust your Intentions

Over the better part of the last decade I have had the good fortune of presenting in schools & school districts, and at a variety of workshops & conferences across North America. The topics have varied, but the message has always been similar: Some things in our system need to change or improve and here are some ways in which I think we can accomplish that goal.

Anyone who knows me knows that my presentation style is fairly direct, clear, honest, and focused on what I perceive to be the job at hand.  I believe what I believe, I try to show credible research and examples of why I believe it, and help others understand what it might look like if applied within their context.  Even as a school leader, I’ve never been one to avoid having the conversations, debating the merits of an issue, or guiding someone to feel compelled to move in what I think is the more appropriate direction.

With all of that, there is one thing I try to avoid at all costs and that is questioning a teacher’s intent and telling them how wrong their career has been up until that moment.

I trust your intentions.

While I might not agree with you and we may – fundamentally – have a completely different view of what is best for our students, I try to avoid being right by proving how wrong you are. I believe that every teacher has the students’ best interest at heart. Whether it is how you develop a positive school climate, how you support students with behavioural challenges, how you assess, grade, and report student progress, or design the instructional experiences for your students, I believe that you believe it is the most effective way to maximize learning. Again, I might not agree with you, but to question your intent, for me, crosses the line. I want what I believe to stand on its own and not rely on simply being the best of the worst; teachers are not inspired by that.

Occasionally, and especially on twitter, I come across 140 character attacks that question the intent of people who have dedicated their careers to teaching and supporting their students.  Words such as malpractice, dangerous, control, power, manipulative, bribery, conspire, and coerce, are thrown around (I’m guessing) for their definitiveness and their shock value.  Bribery as an example, is about coercing people to act in an illegal or immoral way; I don’t know any teachers who do that. It’s easy to have keyboard courage but it’s something else to look people in the eye and inspire them to learn, move, or grow. I’ve come to know – and have experienced several times firsthand – that you don’t need to browbeat people and put them on the defensive in order to create the optimum conditions for change and growth.  Browbeating people through inflammatory language only serves to expose our own insecurities about our convictions, create animosity, and drive people away from the messenger who, in fact, may have a compelling message worth listening to.

Questioning teacher’s intentions cuts to their character and none of us – none – are fully qualified to judge that invisible entity.  I believe many things in our system do need to change and/or evolve, BUT I also believe that 99.99% of the teachers, administrators, district staff, support workers, custodians, secretaries, etc. are doing what they believe is in the best interest of the students in our schools.

Push their thinking, challenge their widely held beliefs, and show them there is a more effective way and they might just feel compelled to listen and follow. Attacking their character and questioning their intent will only lead to them tuning you out and to you becoming white noise.

7 thoughts on “I Trust your Intentions

  1. Tom
    I appreciate this post and its message. As a principal I sometimes need to have tough conversations various stakeholders. I need to be mindful to always hold that professional & ethical line – by never questioning their intention – as you put it – or not “getting personal” as I like to think of it.

    Being respectful, listening with an open ear, speaking truth and demonstrating my own vulnerabilities has proven to be a strategy that has worked for me – thus far.

  2. Thanks Tom. You’ve hit on a key notion that is important for folks to keep at the forefront. If we presume positive intent, it’s amazing what a different outcome can be had. I also maintained that no one gets into education with the intent to be marginal or ineffective. Sometimes our response and/or behavior drives them there.

  3. Hi Tom,
    Reading this post made me think about a recent weekend at SFU. My MEd prof was talking about how, as academics in the midst of thesis writing, we can address sensitive issues with courtesy, respect and kindness. Your writing and point of view in this post serve as an excellent example of this. Having a positive mindset and trusting in others seems so much more natural and effective, makes me wonder why more don’t behave this way.

  4. If teachers’ intentions weren’t positive we would not have such polarization of ideas (phonics vs. whole language, standardized testing vs. no grades, the list goes on and on and on) If teachers (and parents) didn’t want what they thought was best for students they wouldn’t fight so hard for what they thought was right.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s