Don’t be afraid to lead…

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

Leadership matters! We all know it – some may not want to admit it – but leadership does matter, especially when we experience ineffective leadership or worse, when we are the ineffective leader.

As a leader, sometimes you have to articulate a vision and set the direction. Sometimes you have to share your perspective. Sometimes you have to be the leader and let others learn from your experience. As the late Stephen Covey once wrote:

It doesn’t matter how hard you climb the ladder of success if your ladder is up against the wrong wall.

That’s leadership – making sure our educational ladders are up against the right wall.

While much has been written about shared leadership and the advantages of shared responsibility, leaders can’t allow themselves to be marginalized; shared leadership doesn’t mean no leadership. Sometimes leaders lead by example, but there are times when leaders must lead through purposeful articulation. Leading by example only works when you have people’s attention; without their attention the lessons in the example go unlearned. As John Kotter, author of Buy-In, writes:

The single biggest challenge people face when they need to gain buy-in for a good idea is simply getting people’s attention.

Sometimes…

  • …you have to directly address practices you know are far from ideal.
  • …you have to push back against practices that are punitive, unreasonable, or unfair.
  • …you have to make it clear what you can and can’t support.
  • …you have to be comfortable with others’ professional discomfort.

The real question is when; when can a leader be the leader and lead? It really comes down to two things: trust and credibility.

If those you work with trust you and believe you have their best interest in mind they will be more open to being led. Without that trust, people are cautious about following and can’t be sure that you fully support them. So first, leaders must earn trust by proving they are trustworthy. Trust is critical, however, it’s incomplete.

The second component is credibility. Credibility is established when you have shown that you know what you’re talking about. It doesn’t mean that you must have done something; often great leaders have not served in every role within a school or organization. However, it does mean that you have a level of expertise, have done your due diligence, have considered the most favorable course of action, and have the experience to navigate the inevitable bumps and challenges.

Credibility and trust are both earned. Leaders can’t be afraid to lead, but without the necessary levels of trust and credibility, the potential influence of that leadership could be compromised. With high levels of trust and credibility, others are less likely to take challenges to the status quo personally, resist the clearly articulated vision, or feel unsupported.

Real strength…

…means being able to admit you were wrong.

…means being as happy for others’ successes as you are for your own.

…is allowing yourself to be vulnerable.

…means giving more credit than you take.

…means saying more with your actions than you do with your words.

…is liking yourself despite all of your imperfections.

…is never allowing others to determine what’s possible for your life.

…is choosing happiness instead of waiting for it.

…is believing you can when others say you can’t.

…means using every experience as an opportunity to learn & grow.

…is not needing to be the loudest voice in the room.

…means respecting the disrespectful.

…is recognizing when your ego is taking over.

…means trusting people’s intentions.

…means believing in your greatness without needing to prove it to others.

…is about being grateful for what you are instead of desperate for what you are not.

 

What does “real strength” mean to you?

 

Are You Really Open?

Thinking aloud here…

Throughout my career I’ve heard many professionals define themselves as lifelong learners and make reference to the fact that they don’t have all of the answers. Now, I don’t doubt the sincerity of these remarks, however, I wonder sometimes how many of us are actually open to being wrong…I mean really wrong…so wrong that you’re willing to change your mind about something you’ve made definitive remarks about perviously.

Now I get that your definitive positions are research-based, however, those that hold the opposite view likely have research to support their position as well. Okay, now what? Does research actually drive our positions/opinions or do our positions/opinions lead us to giving greater credence to the research that supports our perspective? In other words, if a series of studies points to a particular practice (one which we philosophically disagree with) as being the most favorable course of action, are we truly open & willing to be swayed or will we begin to dismiss the validity of the results or question the character/hidden agenda of the researchers themselves?

It’s one thing to say, “I don’t have all of the answers” but it’s quite another to say, “I was wrong.” No one wants to be wrong, but it would seem that the more definitive we are about a position the less likely we are to admit that maybe we got it wrong, even partially wrong. When was the last time you changed your mind about an issue? I know in this era of instant-response-140-character-definitive-provocative-followers-retweets culture it is hard to admit we were wrong as it might threaten our credibility if we’ve made a definitive statement in the past only to change our minds at a later date. In politics it’s labelled a flip-flop, which is a term I’ve come to loathe. Changing our minds as a result of new information should be seen as being mature and thoughtful, rather than being wishy-washy.

If you have ever thought/said, “I’m not always right about everything” then reflect on when exactly you were wrong and changed your mind? If we say we’re not always right – but act as if we are – then others will quickly recognize our false humility and insincerity.

Being truly open means setting aside our biases and considering new information, research, or practices with a fresh perspective………………..or not………………..after-all, I could be wrong.

…just thinking aloud.

Implement THAT! (Part 7) – Take YOU off the table

Sometimes those who bring the message of a new idea inadvertently make themselves yet another challenge or roadblock that the idea may face. This podcast focuses on two of the most common ways this happens and how we can avoid creating more challenges for us as we pursue new ideas that will make the leanring exerpeince for our students much improved.

Click HERE to listen to this podcast.

Thanks for listening!

 

Implement THAT! (Part 6) – The Acceptance of a New Idea

With any implementation effort, leadership matters.  The focus here is on what leaders can do as a new idea moves through the necessary stages in order to gain full acceptance.

 

This is the first (of what I hope to be many) audio podcasts.  Click here

 

This post/podcast is a continuation of a previous post on “The Birth of A New Paradigm”

 

Thanks for listening!